Flu Vaccines 2011 are already out of the Gate

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Even though it’s only July and we still have 2-3 months before the flu season gets cracking, drug companies and government agencies have been hard at work preparing the vaccines. Some manufacturers are even distributing the vaccines early in an attempt to avoid crippling shortages later in the season.

2011’s flu shots will provide the standard cocktail of protection spreading across a wide range of influenza A and B, which includes the infamous H1N1 strain, known to the pandemic-frightened 2009 world as “Swine Flu.”

(People I know actually made t-shirts that proudly stated ‘I survived the Swine ‘09’).

A quick medical lesson: the premise behind vaccination is that by exposing yourself to a small, innocuous sample of a virus, your body builds antibodies that quickly tackle the small infection. These antibodies are then already in the bloodstream when the bigger, badder version of the flu hits, and your immune system can fight it off without you getting sick.

While vaccination is commonly regarded as the most significant advance in medical history, the immunity for flu shots only lasts long enough to get you through flu season.

That means that if you were vaccinated last year, you should make an effort to be vaccinated again. The CDC recommends the vaccine for anyone six months or older. Different versions of the vaccine have been developed for different age groups.

Here are some things you can do to stay healthy for the 2011 flu season:

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Wash your hands often, especially before each meal. If you don’t have access to soap and water, use alcohol based hand sanitizer.
  • Avoid touching your mucous membranes (eyes, nose, mouth) while out in public areas.
  • Get a yearly flu vaccine – this is especially important or the very young and the elderly, who are at risk for more severe flu complications.

House passes major Flood Insurance legislation: most coastal flood rates to increase, broader coverage options coming!

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On July 12, 2011 the House of Representatives passed a bill (HR 1309) that will fundamentally change the National Flood Insurance Program, the public’s main outlet for flood insurance.  The bill passed by an overwhelmingly bipartisan vote of 402 to 22.  An amendment to close the whole program was roundly defeated.  Senate passage is expected, though when is uncertain.

The existing program was in trouble.  Congress missed four reauthorization deadlines last year, meaning the program lapsed four times for several days at a time, creating havoc in the real estate and insurance markets.  In addition, a lingering debt of $18 billion remains on the books from 2005 (mostly Hurricane Katrina); a hurricane in any metropolitan area in Florida or the Gulf could double that loss in a weekend.  The 112th Congress is less inclined to accept these kinds of unpredictable expenses, and the bill seems to reflect this change in attitude.

The National Flood insurance program has been around for decades and today is the primary vehicle for providing insurance for about 5.5 million property owners around the country.  Locally, many homes from Quincy to Plymouth and hundreds more on the Cape have been rebuilt with NFIP insurance.

Conceptually the National Flood Insurance Program makes sense: private insurers are reluctant to insure against losses that are geographically concentrated because of an insurance concept known as ‘spread of risk’.  A single company can’t accept such concentrated risk without putting its own balance sheet on the line.  The national government can spread risk better: they collect premiums for spring river overflows in the Midwest, winter nor’easters in New England, and fall hurricanes in the Gulf.  The problem is that the current rates are not developed with the same detail as private insurers need when trying to make a profit.  To wit, in 2006, the year after over $17 billion in losses, NFIP rates actually went down.  This pricing failure leads to a problem known as ‘adverse selection’: flood insurance is a great deal if you’re really near the water; it’s not a great deal if you’re only mildly exposed to flood waters.  Thus, the people at the greatest risk get the best (most subsidized) deal.  This is not a formula for long term survival, or even a break-even program.  Consider the findings of a 2006 Congressional Research Service study: the program operated at a loss for 19 of the previous 34 years.  This spring’s midwestern floods likely contributed to pressure for overhaul.  In its existing form, it is truly another disaster waiting to happen.

The program has also been criticized for promoting development in environmentally sensitive coastal areas.  While coastal development was seen as a positive thing 40-50 years ago, today many voters prefer to see remaining undeveloped coastal land and wetlands set aside for conservation.

In the bill passed by the House, rates will be transitioned gradually to risk based premiums.  Many properties with multiple claims will see lower subsidies, and in some cases, insurance may be refused altogether.  During the transition phase, annual premium increases, previously limited to 10% per year, will be capped at 20% per year.  Other features include minimum $2,000 deductibles on subsidized rate properties, and $1,000 deductibles on risk rated properties.  The bill also established a ‘Technical Mapping Advisory Council’ to develop new mapping standards.  In short, the NFIP is transitioning in a direction toward the way for-profit companies measure and charge for risk.

Because of the transition to risk based pricing, some new options will become available: annual increases indexed to inflation, and additional living expenses common with homeowners insurance.  Business income loss will be offered for business properties.  Importantly, the bill reauthorizes the program through 2016, which will provide a measure of certainty severely lacking in previous years.

The bill’s author, U.S. Representative Judy Biggert, R-Ill., said after the vote, this “eliminates barriers to the development of a private flood insurance market, and helps take taxpayers out of the risk business. The NFIP is too important to let lapse, and too in debt to continue without reform. I urge my colleagues in the Senate to speed this legislation to the President’s desk.”  Locally, Congressman Bill Keating of the 10th Congressional district and Stephen Lynch of the 9th, both voted for the bill.  More detailed summaries of the bill are available at thomas.gov site linked here.

For most homeowners along the coast, this will mean higher flood insurance costs beginning this fall.  There are still steps homeowners can take to reduce costs, and to control what kind of insurance you need to buy. Those steps include:

  • Know what zone you are in; if you buy insurance before your local flood map changes, you should be grandfathered to the existing zone. View FEMA’s map pages here
  • If you are in a n A, B, or X zone, getting an Elevation Certificate from a qualified engineer may help you especially if you are on or near the border of a lower rated zone (Your home might be in a better place than the map says).
  • For more about coastal insurance for your home, visit www.agordon.com/home.
    Consider mitigation practices such as those recommended by FEMA and other construction experts.

The bill had broad support from insurance companies and agency groups for improving the predictability and sustainability of the program’s future.   For more about what you can do to contain the cost of insuring property along the coast, visit www.agordon.com/home for more.

Geoff Gordon

The top 10 cheapest and most expensive 2011 cars to insure

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A new year means many things for car buyers; new safety ratings, new models, and new costs. Another aspect of a car search to consider is the cost of Auto insurance; preferably before Royce rolls his brand new auto from the lot.

Fortunately, Insure.com has done the world a great service by ranking the most expensive and least expensive cars to insure. Most of the cars on these lists will come as no surprise to you, but nonetheless good information to have before you adventurously strike out to haggle with the peddlers of the automobile world.

Least Expensive (2011)(Cheapest first)

  1. Chrysler Town and Country LX
  2. Toyota Sienna
  3. Toyota Sienna LE
  4. Honda Odyssey LX
  5. Nissan Murano
  6. Jeep Wrangler
  7. Honda Odyssey EX
  8. Toyota Sienna
  9. Ford Escape
  10. Toyota Highlander
Most Expensive (2011)(Most expensive first)

  1. Mercedes-Benz SL65 AMG
  2. BMW 750i
  3. BMW 750Li
  4. Mercedes-Benz SL63 AMG
  5. Mercedes-Benz S65 AMG
  6. Aston Martin DB9
  7. Mercedes-Benz CL600
  8. Porsche 911 Carrera S
  9. Aston Martin DB9 Volante
  10. Mercedes-Benz G55 AMG

It’s important to note that the car you drive is NOT the only factor that affects your auto insurance rates. Several other factors, including age, gender, area of residence, and annual mileage also play a part in determining the number at the bottom of your car insurance bill. We’ve also written about how each of these affects your insurance, if you’re interested.

As for the car itself, there are reasons that some cost more to insure than others. This is due to safety ratings, top speed, anti-theft devices, and cost. It makes sense that a fast, poorly protected car will be the apple of a thief’s eye and therefore cost more to insure.

Performance: what can this baby do on the highway?

If your car’s engine could power a third world village, your insurance is going to be higher. Insurance companies have to assume that high performance cars are bought for just that reason: to drive fast and practice risky driving behaviors. If you want to keep your insurance low, stay away from performance vehicles.

Foreign Cars:

If your dream car has parts from obscure companies and/or locations, beware. Should you get into an accident (even a minor fender bender), the replacement parts will be much more costly than high supply auto parts. That factors into your insurance cost; in fact, it may factor in even more in the future if gas (and thus shipping) prices continue to rise.

Bigger is not always better:

First and foremost: YOU ARE NOT NECESSARILY SAFER IN A BIGGER CAR. There are many large trucks and SUVs that have inherent safety flaws.  Consult crash test reviews and data before you commit to a larger car. However, even if safer, SUVs are not necessarily the best way to obtain low car insurance. Big cars tend to have a higher liability coverage rate because they do more damage to other cars in accidents.

Consider a ‘family car’:

Remember the ‘high performance, high insurance’ paragraph? Well the converse is also true. Cars associated with ‘routine, safe’ driving behavior are going to cost you less. These are the cars that many think of as ‘family vehicles’: minivans, station wagons, and family sedans. This is due to the fact that ‘family vehicles’ are statistically involved in fewer crashes than other types of cars; therefore, they will cost you less to insure.

 Remember:  insurance companies play a game of numbers; if your car is going to cost more to replace, then you’re going to pay more for it.  With that in mind, go forth and buy the right car for you and your insurer.

And, of course, if you find yourself in an auto insurance pinch, look to Gordon Insurance: we provide both a wealth of information on our website and would be happy to place you with the right insurance agency for you.

Memories

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Remember when:

  • It took 2 minutes for the TV to warm up
  • Your dad made all the decisions
  • Your windshield was cleaned, radiator & oil checked and gas served, without asking, all for free, each & every time
  •  Car keys were always ‘stored’ in the ignition
  • Hula hoops, Jacks & Pick up sticks
  • Penny candy that cost a penny
  • Home milk delivery in glass bottles
  • 33’s & 45’s played on Hi Fi record players
  • Adding machines, mimeograph machines &  typewriters
  • Water balloon fights
  • A neighbor’s new car was the talk of the neighborhood
  • Chinese food was an occasional treat
  • Suits, ties, hats, dresses & gloves were worn to church and on airplanes
  • Bundle boys carried your groceries to your car
  • Sen Sen
  • Brill Cream-  “ A little dab will do ya”
  • Scooter pies
  • Kerosene smudge pots used as highway flares
  • Car tires had inner tubes
  • Wallpaper was hung with wheat paste and every room was wallpapered.
  • All barbeque grills used briquettes
  • Stores and malls were closed on Sundays
  • You had to manually defrost your freezer
  • Polaroid instant cameras
  • The Ivory Soap twins
  • “Winston tastes good, like a cigarette should”
  • Pepsi Cola hits the spot, 10 full ounces, that’s a lot!Remember the slogan, “Your Independent Insurance Agent serves you first”? At A. Gordon Insurance, times haven’t changed. Our friendly staff at A. Gordon Insurance continues to put you first!


Risk in Perspective: Insight and Humor in the Age of Risk Management

A Tribute to Tiger

 

Tiger

He was just a handful of orange fluff when I brought him home, but it was no time at all until he asserted himself as the alpha dog over our aging, laid back Golden Retriever, Baron.  Ever patient, Baron tolerated the little tiger who alternately pulled his ears or slept between his paws.

Somewhere along in his fifth year, Tiger developed Black Skin Disease (known as BSD), which seems to be seen often in Pomeranians.  His pretty pink skin turned black and he lost most of his hair, except  for that on his head and feet.  While not contagious, it did cause second glances from people he encountered.  But his adorable face always outweighed his not-so-adorable body and of course he was oblivious to how he looked.  His vet recommended a regimen of a drug called soloxine, along with melatonin and low and behold, he re-grew about fifty percent of his hair!

Tiger spent the next several  years being a consummate  lap dog.  During the warmer months he would spend hours sitting in the yard either surveying the neighborhood or watching the birds flying overhead.

The addition of other dogs to our family over the span of Tiger’s life never  bothered  him – he seemed to always know that he was special and the others were simply to be tolerated.

After a brief but severe  illness, Tiger crossed over the Rainbow Bridge on June 13, 2011.  He is now back with Baron – and hopefully not pulling his ears.

Universal Cell Phone Chargers No Longer a Pipe Dream

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By 2012, it is anticipated that most cell phones in the United States will use the same kind of connector to charge their batteries. This technology has already been adopted in Europe. LG, Motorola, Nokia, Samsung, and Sony Ericsson, among others, have agreed to use the Micro-USB technology as the common universal charging interface. This single standard will not only make life easier for the more than 3 billion mobile phone users in the world today, but it will lower cost, and help the environment.

While a relatively simple agreement, this represents a huge leap in ease of use for cellphones. If the trend continues and more companies agree to this consensus, every phone charger will become interchangeable between phones. Only 1 or 2 cellphone chargers will be necessary per houseold, rather than the current average of 4-5, reducing the effective cost of owning a cellphone.

Furthermore, cell phone manufacturers are developing chargers that will consume about 50 percent less power. Eliminating the need for people to replace lost chargers will significantly reduce greenhouse gases emitted in the manufacturing and transporting of these extra chargers. It will also mean less waste in landfills because people won’t simply throw away chargers when they stop using their old phones. It is estimated that 700,000 pounds of old cell phone chargers are added to our landfills in the United States annually.

Saving energy and saving our planet is huge. Huge savings for auto, home, business and life insurance are just a call away at A. Gordon Insurance!

Bill Cordaro
Commercial Accounts
Andrew G. Gordon, Inc.
Insurance & Risk Management

The MA Homestead Act Changes: Home Sweet Homestead

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We’ve noticed an uptick in phone calls to our insurance agency,  inquiring about the recent changes to the Massachusetts Homestead Act.  Customers are wondering if they need to make any changes if they already have a Declaration of Homestead filed for their primary residence. New home buyers  or customers refinancing their mortgages are questioning if they need to file documents to obtain any protection. 
Massachusetts and many other states put Homestead laws in place to protect homeowners from losing their primary residences if they have no other assets available to pay their debts.  Under the previous Homestead law, homeowners and their families could protect up to $500,000 of home equity from many types of creditors if they filed a simple Declaration of Homestead at their Registry of Deeds.  Under both the old and new law, if a homeowner records the Declaration of Homestead  before a creditor files a lien against his property, the creditor cannot recover the debt by forcing the homeowner or his family to sell their home as long as the amount of the debt or debts are under $500,000. The Homestead Act does not protect homeowners from debts owed for mortgages, child support and condo association fees.

Here is a summary of the Massachusetts Homestead Law effective March, 2011. The changes were made to reduce ambiguities under the previous Homestead law: 

  • All Massachusetts homeowners receive an automatic homestead exemption of $125,000 for protection against certain creditor claims on their principal residence without having to do anything.
  • All Mass. residents are eligible for a $500,000 “declared homestead exemption” by filing a declaration of homestead at the Registry of Deeds. For married couples, both spouses will now have to sign the form–which is a change from prior practice.
  • If you already have a homestead recorded at the Registry of Deeds, you do not have to re-file it. You are all set, and have the full $500,000 protection.
  • Homesteads are now available on 2-4 family homes, and for homes in trust. This is also new.
  • The existing “elderly and disabled” homestead will remain available at $500,000.
  • If you have a homestead as a single person, and get married, the homestead automatically protects your new spouse. Homesteads now pass on to the surviving spouse and children who live in the home.
  • You do not have to re-file a homestead after refinance. There’s always been confusion here, with lenders requiring homeowners to either subordinate or release homesteads. Under the new law, homesteads are automatically subordinate to mortgages, and lenders are specifically prohibited from having borrowers waive or release a homestead.
  • Closing attorneys in mortgage transactions must now provide borrowers with a notice of availability of a homestead.
  • The cost of filing the Declaration of Homestead is $35 and it must be notarized. Need a notary? Our insurance agency offers free notary services. You can file the document at the Registry of Deeds or  an attorney can file the declaration for you.  

 Hope you find this information helpful. It is not designed to provide any legal advice-as in all areas of the law, to fully understand your rights, you should consult an attorney of your choice.

For more information, here’s an excellent question and answer document.

Kasey McCarthy
CPCU, Andrew G. Gordon, Inc.

Appealing a Surcharge

 

Before you start the process of appealing a surcharge, it is important to first understand how the Merit Rating Board and Safe Driver Insurance Plan (SDIP) work.

 The Merit Rating Board:

All Massachusetts auto insurance companies are required to report at-fault accidents and out-of-state driving records to the Merit Rating Board (MRB). The MRB is the state agency that maintains driving records.
The MRB driving record consists of surchargeable incidents. A surchargeable incident is any event in which you are:

  1. Convicted of, or pay a fine for, a motor vehicle violation
  2. Assigned to an alcohol education program or controlled substance treatment or rehabilitation program
  3. Found to be more than 50 percent at fault for an accident, and your insurance company makes a claim payment above a certain threshold

If you decide not to pursue an appeal, the surcharge can increase your premium and SDIP step.
In addition, each surchargeable incident counts toward possible license suspension.

You are considered to be more than 50 percent at fault in an accident if your insurance company:

  1. Finds you at fault according to one of the 19 At-Fault Standards  and
  2. Has paid a claim of more than $500 for Collision, Limited Collision, Damage to Someone Else’s Property, or Bodily Injury to Others.

Safe Driver Insurance Plan (SDIP)
The Safe Driver Insurance Plan (SDIP) is mandated by state law to establish classifications of risks to fairly reflect the driving records of insureds and adjust premiums based in part on at-fault accidents. The Plan encourages safe driving by rewarding drivers who do not cause accidents or incur traffic law violations with a credit to their automobile insurance premiums, and discourages unsafe driving by requiring high-risk drivers to pay a greater share of insurance costs. Massachusetts, unlike many comparable jurisdictions that afford no or limited due process rights, provides the right to a hearing before an impartial hearing officer of the Board.

If you believe that you are not more than 50% at-fault for an accident in which you received a surcharge, you may appeal the motor vehicle accident surcharge to the Division of Insurance Board of Appeal.

Your insurance company will mail you a Notice of Surcharge.

  1. If any of the information listed on the Surcharge Notice is incorrect (name, driver’s license number or date of accident), contact the issuing insurance company to make the corrections before appealing.
  2. If you do not receive a Surcharge Notice or misplace it:
  3. Contact your insurance agent for a copy of the Surcharge Notice     OR
  4. Request a late appeal from the Merit Rating Board.
  5. Complete the Surcharge Appeal Form located on the reverse side of the Notice of Surcharge.
  • The appeal must be filed within 30 days of the surcharge date.
  • If you did not submit your appeal within 30 days because you never received a Surcharge Notice, you must obtain a Late Appeal from the Merit Rating Board. The Board of Appeal must receive the Late Appeal within 30 days of your policy renewal.
  1. Submit a $50.00 check or money order payable to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts/Board of Appeal.
  • The fee is non-refundable.
  1. Mail your appeal to the post office box designated on the application. Late appeals must be sent directly to the Division of Insurance, Board of Appeal.
  2. Upon receipt of your surcharge application, the Board will mail you a postcard to acknowledge your appeal. Your cancelled check will serve as an additional receipt of your filing.
  3. The Board will mail you a Notice of Hearing approximately 3 weeks prior to your hearing date.
  4. Appeal hearings are scheduled in Boston, Brockton, Cambridge, Peabody, Plymouth, Somerville, Springfield, Waltham, or Worcester. Carefully note the location of your hearing listed on the Notice. Directions are included at the bottom of the Hearing Notice.
  5. Upon receipt of the Hearing Notice, you have three options for which to pursue the appeal:
    1. Appear in Person.
      Bring your Hearing Notice to the scheduled location.
      Bring copies of all relevant information, any documents/photographs etc. that you want the Hearing Officer to consider when making the decision.
    2. Submit a Written Statement in lieu of your appearance.
      The Board must receive your written or typed statement via mail or facsimile at least 5 days priorto your hearing. The statement must include:
      • copies of all relevant information, any documents/photographs etc. that you want the Hearing Officer to consider in making the decision
      • your signature on the Hearing Notice that identifies you are waiving a personal appearance in favor of your written statement & affirms that your statement is truthful.
    3. Select a representative to appear on your behalf.
      If you elect to submit a written statement via a representative, instead of appearing in person, it must include:

      • Copies of all relevant information, any documents/photographs etc. that you want the Hearing Officer to consider in making the decision
      • your signature on the Hearing Notice that identifies you are waiving a personal appearance in favor of your written statement & affirms that your written statement is truthful.

The hearing is informal and public, lasting approximately 20 – 30 minutes. The Hearing Officer will make an audio tape recording of the hearing. You and your insurance company representative will be given an opportunity to present all pertinent information. You may also bring a witness or a witness statement to the hearing. The Hearing Officer may ask you or the representative questions to clarify the information presented or the circumstances of the accident.

At the conclusion of the hearing, the Hearing Officer will take your appeal under advisement. The facts and circumstances presented will be reviewed in accordance with the governing laws and regulations.

The Memorandum of Finding and Order, the Board’s decision, will be mailed to you within 2-4 weeks. The Board will also contact the Commonwealth’s Merit Rating Board and your insurance company so that your driving history record will be properly updated.

  • If the decision is marked VACATE, the Board has found that you were not more than 50% at-fault for the accident. Any points that you received on your driving record as a result of the accident will be removed.
  • If the decision is marked UPHELD, the Board has found that you were more than 50% at-fault for the accident. The surcharge points will remain on your driving record.

If you disagree with the determination of the Board, you may appeal the decision to your county’s Superior Court or in Boston Suffolk County Court. You must file this appeal within 30 days of your receipt of the decision.
A surcharge incurred due to a traffic violation or a non-moving violation are not appealable to the Board…

Bill Cordaro
Commercial Accounts
Andrew G. Gordon, Inc.

MA Documents: The Notorious Notary

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We all know death and taxes are certain. Have you also noticed there is a growing need to have mainstream documents notarized? As recent as a few years ago, common day documents such as simple permission slips for minors for a field trip to the museum  or rental agreements for college age students were simply signed by the  student, parent or guardian. Not so much any longer as many mundane forms now require the official stamp of notarization from your local friendly notary. Here at Andrew G. Gordon Inc., we are happy to help out any customer with our complimentary notary service. This service is also available to new visitors to our agency.

What is a notary, you ask?  A notary public is an official of integrity appointed by the state to serve the public as an impartial witness in performing a variety of official fraud-deterrent acts related to the signing of important documents. These official acts are called notarizations or notarial acts. Notaries are publicly commissioned as “ministerial” officials, meaning that they are expected to follow written rules without the exercise of significant personal discretion, as would be the case with a “judicial” official.

If you are asked for your driver’s license, please do not be offended. It is the duty of a notary to screen the signers of particularly sensitive instruments — such as property deeds, wills and powers of attorney — for their true identity, willingness to sign without duress or intimidation, and  awareness of the general import of the document. Some notarizations also require the notary to put the signer under an oath declaring under penalty of perjury that the information contained in a document is true and correct. Impartiality is the byword of the notary and the foundation of its public trust. Notaries are duty-bound not to act in situations where they have a personal interest. This means the notary cannot notarize a family member’s document.  The public trusts that the notary’s critical screening tasks have not been corrupted by self-interest. Impartiality dictates that a notary never refuse to serve a person due to race, nationality, religion, politics, sexual orientation or status as a non-customer.

Remember that Andrew G. Gordon, Inc. offers complimentary notary services to our clients or new visitors with appropriate documentation.  Stop by and we will be sure to assist you!

Katherine McCarthy
CPCU, Andrew G. Gordon, Inc.

Andrew G. Gordon Insurance: April 2011

Boston Massachusetts: Copley Square

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April is a month that welcomes spring with its famous “showers that bring May Flowers”.  With weather that changes from day to day, April is a fickle month with temperatures ranging anywhere from 15º to 80º that always includes the possibility of a late-season snow storm.  In spite of it all, the crocuses and daffodils manage to bloom and remind us that the warmer half of the year is ahead.

One of the infamously less appreciated events in April is the dreaded holiday known to most Americans as “income tax day”.  This year, however, due to the Patriot’s Day holiday, the filing deadline is extended to April 19th.

A short side note: Patriots Day is a celebration of the beginning of the American Revolutionary War between the British and the Colonial Americans which began on April 19, 1775.  Both Massachusetts and Maine celebrate the holiday on the third Monday in April (nearest to the 19th).  As such, a reenactment of the battle is annually held on Lexington Green, with a mid-morning parade in Concord featuring fife and drum bands.  But, if you plan to attend, it’s best to get there early to get a good vantage spot.  And don’t forget to take advantage of the several pancake breakfasts hosted by area churches.

April also offers the Boston Marathon, the oldest marathon in the world – founded in 1897.  It too, is held on the 3rd Monday in April during the Patriots Day holiday. The race begins in Hopkinton and ends at Copley Square in Boston, a total of 26.22 miles.  About 20,000 runners from around the world take part.  The first starters are the wheelchair runners.  Next are the Elite Women, then the Elite Men and then wave after wave of other runners.  The race lasts most of the day, with some runners straggling in after dark.

And, of course, for you fishermen out there, April is the opening of the Cod fishing season in Massachusetts!

Have a great April!

Sandi C.
Andrew G. Gordon, Inc.
Insurance & Risk Management

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