Simple Stuff, Insurance, and Other Things that are not Synonymous

A brief introduction; my name is Corbin, and I’ve been a social media engineer for Andrew G. Gordon, Inc. for the past 2 months. I’m about to enter my senior year of high school, and insurance is not an entity I’ve had any sort of contact with prior to this job. However, seeing as a succinct job summary of my position would be “gracing the internet with insurance information”, I’ve been exposed to a veritable hailstorm of news, literature, and media all relating to insurance. Poor metaphors aside, I have been able to catch a glimpse into the insurance world, and I’ve managed to cement a few rational impressions about insurance that I might as well share with the internet.

Impression the First:

INSURANCE IS COMPLICATED. Why did I exert the energy to depress the caps-lock key (twice!) in the previous sentence? Because it’s super important. Perhaps there was once a day when cavemen and wooly mammoths nonchalantly shot the breeze about easy to understand coverage and liability policies, but that age is now far in the past. The fact is that insurance is a very complicated entity to deal with, and it has to be, considering the services it must provide. So before you embark on an insurance venture, find good insurance information (trust me, it’s out there) and arm yourself. With some research, you will be an insurance wizard in no time. On an unrelated note, if you are at the point where you are searching for insurance information and stumbled upon this blog, I would like to extend to you the chance to view our website’s “whiteboard talks”. These are educational videos about insurance created for the benefit of humankind, and you can click here to take advantage of them.

Impression the Second:

The insurance industry is not an evil machine out to harm you. Despite this common misconception, every experience I’ve had working at A.G. Gordon, Inc. suggests to me that insurance companies make every effort to make the customer experience a good one. I’ve seen many examples of healthy insurance relationships, business and personal. Despite the generally formidable “street rep” of insurance companies, if you find a good agency, both insurer and policy-holder will be playing for the same team.

Impression the Third:

Understand your coverage. While this is loosely tied to impression the first, I feel it holds enough significance to earn its own paragraph. As I post blogs and summarize articles about insurance, I notice that there are fairly common issues that most people aren’t aware of. Did you know that if a dwelling in MA is left unoccupied for 60 days, the building is considered vacant and fire coverage is cancelled? I didn’t, which isn’t shocking, but neither did my parents, and we’ve moved over 10 times in the course of my childhood, often leaving vacant homes in our wake. How about that rust or other corrosion, mold, or wet or dry rot damage is not usually covered in homeowner’s policies? By taking time to do some policy research, you could save yourself some headaches down the road. And if you are currently a homeowner, I would advise you look at our homeowner’s checklist, a goldmine of good information.

And for topical and relevant insurance information and risk-management solutions, visit us at our website.

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About Geoff Gordon
Geoffrey Gordon, CFP(r), CIC, CRM joined the agency in 1982, after working in sales for a national carrier and then for a Massachusetts life insurance agency. Geoff earned his CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER (TM) certification in 1985, his Certified Insurance Counselor (CIC) designation in 1994, and completed his Certified Risk Manager (CRM) designation in 2004. Geoff has been president and owner of the agency since 1987, and devotes most of his time to assisting new and existing commercial accounts in reducing the cost of risk. As a small business owner facing many of the same challenges most of our commercial clients face, Geoff appreciates and understands how managing risk can deliver bottom line results.

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